Conservation Minnesota

Spring 2014 Newsletter: Survey Results Guide Our 2014 Work

Thumbnail-PaulEvery year at Conservation Minnesota, we ask Minnesotans like you what issues you believe are most important for protecting Minnesota’s lakes, land, and way of life.  Our board and staff then take that information, and use it to develop our strategic priorities for the year.

Over 24,000 Minnesotans have taken a minute of their time to tell us what they cared about.  This information has helped shape our work for 2014.

This year we’ll be working to:

          • Combat the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species like Asian Carp and Zebra Mussels.
          • Get more energy from renewable sources like wind and solar.
          • Protect the Boundary Waters and Lake Superior from sulfuric acid pollution from proposed sulfide mines.
          • Reduce waste and increase the amount that Minnesota recycles.
          • Help protect Minnesota children from toxic chemicals by passing the 2014 Toxic Free Kids Act.
          • Protect our drinking water, our lakes, and our rivers from contamination by chemicals, pesticides, and agricultural run-off.
          • Ensure that Legacy Amendment funds are used to create new investments in clean water, parks, and wildlife habitat, and not just replace traditional sources of funding such as general funds and bonding.

We are excited to be working on the issues Minnesotans told us were most important.  You can help by joining Conservation Minnesota.  Become a member for just $5 at http://my.ConservationMinnesota.org/member.  For a limited time your contribution will be triple matched!

Together we can protect the Minnesota you love.

Sincerely,

Paul's Signature

Paul Austin
Executive Director

About Paul Austin

Paul Austin
Paul Austin has 23 years of public service as an elected leader, advocate and political strategist, Paul Austin brings a rare combination of skills and experience to his position as Executive Director. At age 25, Paul was elected Mayor of Clinton, Connecticut – the youngest in state history. Paul has served as Executive Director of Conservation Minnesota since 2004.
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